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Canada’s inflation rate slows to 3.1%

Canada's consumer price index rose by 3.1 per cent in the year up to October, down from 3.8 per cent the previous month but in line with what economists were expecting.

Gasoline prices the biggest reason for the deceleration

A cashier works a cash register.

Canada's consumer price index rose by 3.1 per cent in the year up to October, down from 3.8 per cent the previous month but in line with what economists were expecting.

Statistics Canada reported Tuesday that the biggest reason for the deceleration in the cost of living was a drop in the cost of gasoline, which declined by 6.4 per cent during the month of October alone, and is down by 7.8 per cent compared to where prices were a year ago.

If gasoline is stripped out of the numbers, the inflation rate would have been 3.6 per cent in October. That's slightly lower than the 3.7 per cent non-gasoline inflation rate clocked the month before.

Food prices increased at a 5.4 per cent pace over the past year. While that's still higher than the overall inflation rate, it's down from the 5.8 per cent annual pace seen in September. Grocery prices have now decelerated for four months in a row.

While the pain at the cash register for staples like food and gasoline is easing, plenty of other aspects that contribute to the cost of living continue to increase at an eye-watering level.

Rent keeps going up at its fastest pace in years. The data agency says the typical cost of rent went up by 8.4 per cent in the past year. That's up from 7.3 per cent in September.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Pete Evans

Senior Business Writer

Pete Evans is the senior business writer for CBCNews.ca. Prior to coming to the CBC, his work has appeared in the Globe & Mail, the Financial Post, the Toronto Star, and Canadian Business Magazine. Twitter: @p_evans Email: pete.evans@cbc.ca

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