Continuity from change

They say that change gives us branches and continuity gives us roots. One of the key characteristics of good governance is its sustainability even through periods of significant change. In business where board members can change through a period of time, the company methodology remains intact and unchanging, even if operational results are altered in the process. Weathering ups and downs forms part of the process in strong organizations and ultimately, despite this, competent governance remains to be at the forefront. Successful companies therefore have their methodologies of governance in place and weathering the storm becomes part of meaningful work.

In this pandemic, governments all over the world are heavily impacted as situations require them to come up with new processes to continue core operations and at the same time, manage the impact this crisis has on public service. Leaders all over the world must find a balance between mitigating a crisis while keeping good governance principles. If it is one thing that this pandemic is teaching us, it is the fact that a crisis does not choose the poor over the rich or the rich over the poor but rather, it is teaching us that the answer remains in inclusive growth.

Just like big companies that have through the years gained both success and credibility in their respective industries by ensuring sustainability based on their core methodologies, the same goes for public servants in public office where good governance and succession of ownership is deeply rooted in best practices.

Governance per se is understood in so many ways among people. The past few years have shown us how public servants and civic society are called to converge. The Whole of Nation approach is meant to instill in all of us an active participation in nation building as we look up to leaders who have planted in our communities the best practices meant to sustain future generations while being faced with the challenges confronted by all in this pandemic.

We have never really heard such concepts before – convergence, whole of nation, or even whole of city. Such words only signify that inclusivity is the answer to the development of our communities. Every day we are learning more about our participation in continuing long-term programs. What was once fragmented for us is now becoming clearer as roots have been planted through change. We have come this far and as brothers and sisters from Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, we must admit that we have gotten to know one another much better because of change.

Now it is time to be deeply rooted and continue to grow. It is a process that bears fruit in due time but we need to do the work. In the long run, it will be worth it.

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Credit belongs to : www.philstar.com

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