Random Image Display on Page Reload

Trudeau hints at tougher penalties for car thieves as Ottawa seeks ideas to tackle thefts

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau suggested today his government is considering tougher penalties for auto theft as the head of the RCMP warned that some thefts are being carried out with "extreme violence."

Government hosting a daylong national summit in Ottawa

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers his opening remarks at an auto theft summit, Thursday, February 8, 2024 in Ottawa.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau suggested Thursday his government is considering tougher penalties for auto theft as the head of the RCMP warned that some thefts are being carried out with "extreme violence."

"It's unprecedented," RCMP Commissioner Mike Duheme told the daylong national summit on auto theft in Ottawa.

"And the extreme violence that's associated to that and what we're seeing, it's something that was never seen before."

Trudeau told the gathering of cabinet ministers, law enforcement and border officials and industry players that the rise in thefts of cars and trucks over the past few years "has been alarming."

"Organized crime is becoming more brazen, and the overseas market for the stolen cars is expanding," he said.

  • This week Cross Country Checkup wants to know: Have you ever had your car stolen before? What story do you have about car theft? Fill out the details on this form and send us your stories.

Ontario Provincial Police Commissioner Thomas Carrique told summit participants how lucrative the grand theft auto industry can be. Spotters, who identify vehicles to steal, can make between $75 and $100, he said, while exporters can make up to $80,000 by exporting a stolen vehicle overseas, where its resale value can double.

WATCH | OPP commissioner breaks down how the 'complex' auto theft market works

OPP commissioner breaks down how the 'complex' auto theft market works

4 hours ago

Duration 1:01

During a summit in Ottawa on auto theft, Ontario Provincial Police Commissioner Thomas Carrique explained the process of stealing a car, and says that it puts lives in danger.

"This is a very complex criminal market facilitated by criminal organizations," Carrique said.

Ahead of Thursday's summit in Ottawa, the federal government announced it would spend $28 million to help curb exports of stolen vehicles.

Poilievre says Canadians are 'living in fear'

The Liberal government said Wednesday the money will give CBSA more capacity to detect and search shipping containers carrying stolen cars.

The summit and the influx of cash come after a week when the Conservatives hammered the Liberals over the surge in auto thefts and floated policy ideas of their own.

Earlier this week, Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre said Trudeau's "mismanagement has allowed organized crime to take over the operations and the running of our federal ports and use them to transport cars stolen in places like Brampton to the Middle East, to Africa and to parts of Europe.

"Canadians are living in fear."

Trudeau took a swipe at Poilievre at the summit, saying "catchy slogans" and two-minute videos won't solve the problem.

The federal government says an estimated 90,000 cars are stolen annually in Canada, resulting in about $1 billion in costs to Canadian insurance policy-holders and taxpayers.

Public Safety Minister Dominic LeBlanc said the government will have more to announce in the coming weeks

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Catharine Tunney is a reporter with CBC's Parliament Hill bureau, where she covers national security and the RCMP. She worked previously for CBC in Nova Scotia. You can reach her at catharine.tunney@cbc.ca

With files from the Canadian Press

Minority Report

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

Your weekly guide to what you need to know about federal politics and the minority Liberal government. Get the latest news and sharp analysis delivered to your inbox every Sunday morning.

...

The next issue of Minority Report will soon be in your inbox.



Discover all CBC newsletters in the Subscription Centre.opens new window

*****
Credit belongs to : www.cbc.ca

Check Also

Fake nurse pleads guilty to assaulting patients by IV injection

A fake nurse who treated hundreds of people at medical facilities in Vancouver and Victoria …